8 Myths About e-mobility

Many myths exist surrounding the field of e mobility. Here we aim to counter-argue eight of the most common myths by providing explanations as to why the assumption is just a myth and more importantly why it shouldn’t be believed.

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There are many myths surrounding e mobility

Myth 1)              E-Vehicles will never replace ICE models

Although the growth in adoption of e-vehicles has been dented a little in 2020 by COVID-19 the evidence is irrefutable that they will eventually replace ICE (internal combustion engine) vehicles.

Many factors influence the migration, these are primarily for environmental reasons, which over the last few years have driven legal and regulatory changes. For further information please read our article – the advantages and benefits of e mobility

Myth 2)              E mobility only includes electric cars

It’s easy to think of e mobility and electric cars (e-cars) interchangeably as if they are “one and the same thing”. They are in reality actually quite different, e mobility includes e-cars, but it’s just one category. Within the scope of e mobility are all the other product ranges too:

  • Drones and unmanned aerial vehicles
  • Electric bikes (often called e-bikes)
  • Electric helicopters
  • Electric hoverboards
  • Electric planes
  • Electric scooters (also called e-scooters)
  • Electric ships and oil tankers
  • Electric vehicles (buses, cars, vans and planes – see the definition below)

It’s important to remember that all vehicles which are mobile through electric means potentially fall under the banner of e mobility.

Myth 3)              A lack of charging infrastructure will stop people buying electric vehicles

Naturally, this a barrier as we have previously written about this in this article. The fact is though that the charging infrastructure is growing as each year passes. Many uninformed people assume that a public infrastructure is required but for many owners charging at home and in the workplace (if available) is enough.

Although home infrastructure is less practical in some homes (e.g. flats and apartments), many buyers are seeing the other benefits of e-vehicles and buying ahead of the infrastructure. As demand increases so will supply, with a likely substitution for example from fuel pumps to electric charging points at fuel stations.

Although this is a barrier, it’s not one which is strong enough to stop the wide-scale purchasing of e-vehicles.

Although home infrastructure is less practical in some homes (e.g. flats and apartments), many buyers are seeing the other benefits of e-vehicles and buying ahead of the infrastructure. As demand increases so will supply, with a likely substitution for example from fuel pumps to electric charging points at fuel stations.

Although this is a barrier, it’s not one which is strong enough to stop the wide-scale purchasing of e-vehicles.

Myth 4)              Charging takes too long

Again (as with charging infrastructure) this is a genuine issue right now but is one which will improve. As charging infrastructure and technology grows so will the speeds with which electric charging points can charge their vehicles.

For most electric vehicle owners who charge at home, leaving the car to charge overnight whilst they sleep is enough. Another proportion of the market, charge at their workplace as they are working. So, for this proportion of the market the time taken is immaterial as they are not actively waiting anyway.

For the majority of owners charging at fuel stations, electric charging points and on motorways a maximum of 15-30 minutes will be the most they will need to wait. In some cases, just a few minutes as a top-up is adequate on faster charging points. As more points are appearing, so are faster points too, this issue will reduce over a period of time.

Myth 5)              Electric vehicle range is inadequate

For most drivers they will drive less than 50 miles per day, this is easily delivered through the range of even the lowest range batteries. Many people assume that electric vehicles are only good for city driving, but that’s not really true.

With careful planning, owners will be able to travel 150+ miles. Owners will need to know how much charge they have on the outset of their journey and also where charging points are along the route (this is easy to find out via the internet).

With most publicly accessible points being fast it doesn’t take too much time to charge and single-day journeys of 300+ miles are easily achievable. As technology advances and more points become available, which charge even quicker on even more powerful longer range batteries this situation can only improve.

Of course, for those owners who drive hybrid vehicles, they will also be able to top-up their electric power with fuel for longer journeys.

Myth 6)              A rise in electric vehicles will crash power grids

It is true that power grids around the world will need to ramp-up capacity to deliver the electricity needed for e-vehicles. A major benefit expected though is that much of the electricity consumption is expected to be off-peak when demand is lower (as people charge from home as they sleep).

Whatever the increase in demand the power companies will have adequate notice to plan and will improve the infrastructure as required. Some hybrid vehicles may even deliver electricity back to the grid potentially. So, this is a myth that won’t happen, whatever the increase in demand the power companies will be able to cope!

Myth 7)              Electric batteries are not environmentally-friendly and can’t be recycled

This assumption just isn’t true, already leading experts state that over 90% of the battery cell can be recycled. At the moment though, this isn’t happening often enough and it’s the recycling process which needs to change so that increasingly more batteries are recycled in the years to come.

Pressures from legislation and regulation will force manufacturers to take care and increase their responsibility for recycling batteries to the maximum extent. With batteries using precious metals such as copper, aluminium and lithium merely discarding them is like throwing money away, so increasingly they will be sensibly recycled.

Many parts from an electric car can be recycled including the motor and the battery

Many parts from an electric car can be recycled including the motor and the battery

Myth 8)              Concerns about battery prices and viability in the future

Potential owners are concerned about both battery price increases in the future, which are fuelled because batteries demand scarce precious resources (such as lithium).

The fact is the Automotive industry are investing heavy amounts into battery R&D annually and are seeking ways to reduce the price of batteries and also reducing the amount of expensive/precious resources required.

Although in many cases a battery won’t last the lifetime of a vehicle, manufacturers have a range of options such as battery leasing and swapping, which make costs more predictable and controllable. Although, the projected demand for battery materials is high there are adequate supplies of all materials to provide future market growth.

Additionally, battery prices are forecast to drop in the future, mainly due to a dependency on cobalt, economies of scale and also technological innovations.

Contact SPI Lasers to discuss e mobility

Hopefully, we have blasted away some of the myths relating to e mobility for you in this article? If you have any additional remaining questions please do not hesitate to contact us. Subscribe to receive regular updates at this link.

 

 

Image Credits: Tartanfastic, Andreas160578 and Photoman

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